Marco Polo Title Sequence

Hey everyone! Nicky here 🙂

Every so often, especially when I take a break while working on my projects, I visit the website Art Of The Title. The website is a collection of different title sequences from around the world for film, television, and video games, and includes the creative process behind them.

After watching the title sequence for this show, I was in complete awe. The title sequence mimics traditional Chinese painting, showing various gruesome imagery, including a field of bodies on stakes, a tethered hawk, and a severed head. Multiple clips of macro shots of the ink spreading across the paper to form the recognizable drawings create a gorgeous aesthetic that fits the tone of the show and is definitely memorable.

Immediately I started asking myself questions like these: HOW WAS THIS MADE? WHAT SOFTWARE WAS USED? IS THIS LIVE SHOT OR ANIMATION? HOW CAN I MAKE SOMETHING SIMILAR TO THIS???
Since the website features, how the creators came to making the title sequence, I read through the discussion with the team from The Mill so I can understand the steps they took through the process.

With any film project, the majority of the time is spent researching and developing concepts. According to Bryce Wymer, co-director of The Mill, “We did a ton of research. I looked at everything from old spaghetti western posters from the early 1960s to 1200s Mongolian horse saddles. I also spent the better part of two days in the Asian arts wing of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.” As well, the team presented a range of directions that could be developed, including using ink to convey the graphic elements within the title sequence. What makes using ink in the title sequence successful is that it creates a juxtaposition; a “safe” and traditional medium creating violent images.

Unused frame from Art Of The Title

While reading the rest of the discussion, I was happy to read about the process of how they shot the ink drawings, what their set up was, and equipment and software they used. After setting up the paper and the other materials, the team set up two Red Epic cameras, one overhead and one floating on a slider. This assured the team that they would capture as much coverage as possible. Also, using two cameras allowed them to safely capture any unexpected ink happening in the wide shots and also get some macro shots on the other camera.

Furthermore, they provided a quick breakdown of the overall process in short:

  1. Digitally project completed illustrations on white 100% cotton watercolor paper
  2. Two to three people paint in the illustration with clear water so the image is completely made of water
  3. Turn off digital projector. Now you just have clear water on white paper
  4. Two Red Epic cameras are set up. One locked, one on a slider
  5. Tilt the table to the right degree to get the water flowing in the desired direction
  6. Two to three people drop Sumi ink onto various spots within the illustration depending on how we want the story to unfold
  7. Edit composite, build shots
  8. Grade (color correction)

Reading through the article about the makings of the Marco Polo title sequence, I feel quite inspired. Based on how the team made their vision a reality, I know that I am capable of creating something just as remarkable.

 

FITC Tokyo Title Sequence

Hey everyone! Nicky here 🙂

If I could describe this video in one word, it would be this; mesmerizing. After watching this video for the FITC Tokyo conference for this year, I couldn’t help but press replay over and over again. Each time I watched the video, I tried to deconstruct how the video was made; the multiple layers and elements.

According to the description of the video, the title sequence was “sought to encapsulate the city itself – distilled to graphic form.” It was also made to “contrast the harmonies of traditional Japanese culture against the backdrop and sensory overload of present-day Tokyo.” Based on the designers’ objectives for the video, they clearly created the illusion of overload.

The director of the video is Ash Thorp, a graphic designer, illustrator, and creative director for a multitude of different mediums, including films. His design and direction for the video takes on a style of glitch. He pushes a harsh colour palette, dominant typographic style, simple geometry, gradients and isometric elements.

What amazes me most about this title sequence is its level of complexity. Creating this video would have had to require a massive library of different textures and materials layered over top of each other. As well, the amount of time and planning must have been a hefty task, just to work out each individual frame, animation, key frame, and transition.

I encourage you to the watch the video and truly witness something mesmerizing!

Even the stills from the video are beautiful!

fitctokyo2015_large_0007 fitctokyo2015_large_0006

Here is the website where you can view the stills as well:
http://albertomoss.com/work/fitctokyo2015

Silence of the Lambs – Title Sequence

Hey Everyone!

This week is my final week of the first duration of summer school and I’m quite exhausted!
6 weeks really goes by so fast it’s unbelievable…

In my Graphic Narrative, Animation, and Motion, our final assignment was… you guessed it… a Title Sequence!

With this being my 3rd title sequence project at OCAD, I wanted to create something with more depth and raw footage. Also, I wanted to pick a film out of my comfort zone… HORROR!

I picked a pretty well known film called Silence of the Lambs, mainly because the original opening credits for the film is pretty DREADFUL!

So here’s my title sequence:

500 Days of Summer Title Sequence

Hey fellow readers!

Its time for the post I’ve been dying to write about: My Title Sequence Assignment.

Here’s the brief I received from by professor
– In Title Sequence, you will create a new title sequence (also known as opening credits) for an existing film of your choosing. This introductory sequence is intended to (fictionally) replace the movie’s original opening credits. This assignment will demonstrate your knowledge of narrative, sequence, cinematic techniques and exhibit your ability to skillfully convey original concept.

So, I started off making a storyboard:

Nicole Clarizio-Title Sequence Storyboard

 

I ended up not completely following my storyboard (sorry folks no kissing in this video).

😛

But here is my final video for you viewing pleasure. I ended up using Adobe After Effects for the clip editing and Adobe Premier to put the clips together!

So enjoy 500 Days of Summer: Title Sequence

And that is my Title Sequence Assignment!

Now I want to make title sequences for other movies… MMMUUUUAAAAHAHHAHAHAHAHAHAHHA!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Excitement x100

So hey there!

In a post I wrote a while ago, Sketch it Up, I mentioned a project I was working on for school: my title sequence. Now, within the post I did write that I would explain the project in more detail when I was completely finished with it. 

I will keep my promise and make a post specifically for my title sequence, however I JUST CAN’T CONTAIN MY EXCITEMENT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

So instead, I’ll just give you a sneak peek (cuz I’m an incredibly nice person)

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Sketch it Up

I AM SUPER SUPER EXCITED!!!!!!!!!!!!

LIKE SO EXCITED THAT I CANT CONTROL MYSELF!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I’m all excited because tomorrow will be my first shoot for my title sequence 🙂 

I will explain this project more in detail when it’s all completed, but here is some drawings I made for it so far:

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